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Heard in the halls: students’ reactions to the outcome of the presidential election

Mayra+Favela+leads+a+sit+in+at+the+beginning+of+8th+Block.+Students+showed+support+for+each+other+for+about+10+minutes+and+then+returned+to+class.
Mayra Favela leads a sit in at the beginning of 8th Block. Students showed support for each other for about 10 minutes and then returned to class.

Mayra Favela leads a sit in at the beginning of 8th Block. Students showed support for each other for about 10 minutes and then returned to class.

Tor Gullholm

Tor Gullholm

Mayra Favela leads a sit in at the beginning of 8th Block. Students showed support for each other for about 10 minutes and then returned to class.

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For the most part our students may not be able to cast a vote yet, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have a voice. They definitely had some opinions about the outcome of yesterday’s election. Here is sampling of what they had to say during 2nd lunch today.

“The American population is challenged and doesn’t know who they just voted for.” -C. O.

“It’s not going to be fair for everyone and there aren’t going to be equal opportunities anymore. Racism is going to be more common now.” – M. S.

“I’m not really into politics and I don’t really care.” – J. C.

“I’m very upset about the outcome. I think the media fooled us into thinking Hillary was winning.” – O. M.

“I’m pretty happy, I think a lot of people today are really upset about it but they need to look at the bigger picture of it. A lot of Hillary supporters wanna protest about Trump winning but Trump supporters weren’t gonna protest either way. It’s not that big of a deal.” C. D.

“I think it was strange that Hillary won in popular votes but Trump won in electoral votes. It will probably be worse with Trump. His ideas aren’t the best for this country.” K. Z.

“I’m really concerned about what’s going to happen. RIP America.” M. R.

“If Trump can’t handle his own Twitter, what make us think he can handle our nuclear codes?” -R. H.

“It makes Muslims and myself feel unsafe and unequal.” – S. A.

“He will tighten our immigration policy, but that’s it.” -E. G.

“I’m genuinely upset. I don’t know what our future is going to be like now.” – E. P.

“I’m terrified and mad.” – F. D.

“I am very upset and think it turned out this way because of how disliked the candidates were.”

– H. B.

“ I’m extremely disappointed. Obviously Hillary Clinton was the better choice and I’m worried what will happen to minority groups, LGBTQ+ community, abortion rights, and more.”  – R. S.

“I’ve never cared for politics but this caught my attention. Times have changed but people haven’t.” – T. K.

“If you want a homophobic, racist, and sexist person ruling out country that’s on you BOO.” – H. K.

“… Neither of them were much of a candidate, so I don’t have much preference either way, I guess I was sort of rooting for Hillary, but it doesn’t bother me. I think [Trump] will help out our economy more than Hillary would. Besides that I don’t really know if there is nothing good about him.” – L. H.

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2 Comments

2 Responses to “Heard in the halls: students’ reactions to the outcome of the presidential election”

  1. PeacefulProtest on January 16th, 2017 12:46 pm

    I find it interesting as to just how little critical thinking is being done by some of your “interviews”, you seem to completely forget that the electoral college is here for a reason. It was created in order to be fair to the states. If we simply followed a strict popular vote, California, New York, and Texas would be the deciding factors. This would be an end to our federal presidential constitutional republic. If the popular vote was the method of choice, the states’ interests would be lost. States were created to function with semi-autonomy and together they form the USA, so if the popular vote was allowed, states in the midwest and states such as Oregon with lower populations would not have much value. Farm areas would receive no acknowledgment as they make up less of the population compared to high density population areas such as cities. If you want to have truly equal representation between people groups, it is necessary to use the electoral college.

    [Reply]

  2. ConcernedForThePawBias on January 16th, 2017 1:04 pm

    Who is the author of this article, I only see “staff.”

    [Reply]

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